PHOTOS - Latest look at the Polynesian Resort Great Ceremonial House refurbishment

16 days ago in "Disney's Polynesian Resort"

Polynesian Village Resort Great Ceremonial House - October 12 2020

Crews have wasted no time getting started on the Great Ceremonial House refurbishment at Disney's Polynesian Resort, with 5 pieces of the roof beams already removed.

When complete, the roofline will have fewer beams and a new look.

The main entrance is now closed off to pedestrians and vehicles.

The Pagu Pagu building is the temporary home to Magical Express arrivals and check-in.

Signage at the main entrance of the Great Ceremonial House directs guests to the side and rear entrances.

Inside, there isn't yet much to see, although the next major impact will be the closure of the monorail station on November 2 2020.

Click the gallery for more pictures of the Great Ceremonial House refurbishment.

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Article Posted: Oct 13, 2020 / 11:19am ET
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rowrbazzle2 days ago

I think I understand. Thanks for replying.

Bocabear2 days ago

you don't have to over explain it...The beams were a nod to the Polynesian architecture... and a grand and visible feature of the Great Ceremonial Hall. They are visible and recognizable from great distances. If some people don't understand what they are, well there is not convincing we can do about that. I understood them even when I was a child and went to WDW... and again, without them, the building is a flat roofed box indistinguishable on the skyline of Walt Disney World. I get it that the Monorail station needed some work...but as for the rest of the project, they just de-furbished the Great Ceremonial House a couple years ago ruining it's iconic lobby... There are many many other places around the property that need more work than this building does...

UNCgolf2 days ago

I guess I'm not really getting my point across well. It's not that I thought they were actually the roof, but that they were dense enough to actually evoke the Polynesian style roof that @_caleb posted above. With they way they are spaced out in the concept art, they no longer evoke that at all to me. I definitely seem to be in the minority, but the spaced out beams just look like random dross scattered on top as opposed to evoking the actual Polynesian style that the denser beams did.

rowrbazzle2 days ago

Interesting. I never thought of them as actually being the roof. As if they were humongous beams that originated on the ground and formed the frame of the building? Kind of like the top of a teepee, but a different shape?

DisneyOutsider2 days ago

Well, now I think I see the engine behind our disagreement. I think you'd be hard-pressed to find many others who thought those beams looked like the roof. They're kinda cool, but they've never given me that effect. Maybe I just spend way too much time there to suspend disbelief.

UNCgolf2 days ago

Again, it's because the beams were so dense that it actually looked like they were the roof (and in the Polynesian style). Fewer beams just looks like nothing; it no longer looks like that style. I understand if it doesn't matter to you, but it seems so obvious to me that I'm honestly surprised other people don't see it even if they don't care.

LastoneOn2 days ago

It't fine. If it turns you off don't stay there. Next problem?

rowrbazzle2 days ago

Oh, cool. That matches the ends of many of the buildings and some other structures throughout the resort.

DisneyOutsider2 days ago

Yes, a Polynesian-inspired roof-line is very distinguishable and an example of this is the new port cochere in the concept art... but those trusses obviously wouldn't be observable external to the structure as the beams are. To me these beams are a sort of caricature-ized feature of Polynesian architecture.. sort of like tiki culture. I'm not saying I'm anti-beam.. just that I don't see any reason why more beams is architecturally superior to less beams in this case.

_caleb2 days ago

Isn't there an architectural roofline actually called "polynesian" truss? Maybe that's not common?

UNCgolf2 days ago

The beams are the only part I have a problem with -- and it's just that they no longer even appear to serve any kind of purpose. They were always a bit strange, since as @_caleb said, it seems like they should have been the supports for a roof rather than just out there in the open, but they were so densely packed it still kind of worked. Once they're spread out, my mind immediately thinks, "what are those even supposed to be? why are they there?"

DisneyOutsider2 days ago

Hmm, I just don't agree with that. I don't see any reason why it doesn't work with less beams other than it's a bit different than what we're used to seeing. Maybe part of it is that despite being in love with the resort, I don't have very strong feelings for those beams as they've always appeared. I think having them certainly looks better than not having them, but thehe beams aren't really emulating any sort of well known architectural features from the real world. The overall look of the concept art actually adds more Polynesian inspiration versus what was there before.

_caleb2 days ago

I always figured those rafters were all that was left after a major hurricane blew all the thatching off the roof. You mean the building beneath these isn't open to the elements?

UNCgolf2 days ago

The spaced out is the problem. The beams don't work when they're spaced out like that -- as I said, they no longer look like they are supposed to be part of the roof of the building. They just look like something stuck on top for no real reason and I do think it looks absolutely terrible. They would be better off with no beams at all if there are only going to be a handful up there with huge gaps. But as I also said, who knows what the actual plan is. The concept art is exceptionally bad architecturally, though.